Local History

We need local history items please. If you have any stories about people or places in the villages or if you know an elderly resident who has stories please send them in to: ashfun-pc@hotmail.co.uk. We and the rest of the Parish would love to read them. If you have any pictures of the villages or villagers as they were please send them to us for the Photo Album page.

Norfolk Record Office Events July – December 2015

Click on this link to find out about all the events planned by the Norfolk Record Office between July and December 2015

http://www.archives.norfolk.gov.uk/view/NCC162395

FUNDENHALL – COMMEMORATION OF THE MEN WHO DIED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR

INFORMATION and HELP BEING SOUGHT – for the joint venture between the Sixth Form pupils of Norwich School and the ongoing heritage project of St Nicholas Church which is seeking to research more about the men of Fundenhall who died in the Great War “RECONNECTING WITH FUNDENHALL’S FALLEN” Please scroll on to the title below for full details of the project and contact numbers.

Reconnecting with Fundenhall’s Fallen_2 (1)

 

4 AUGUST 2014 – COMMEMORATION of ASHWELLTHORPE MEN on 100th ANNIVERSARY of START OF FIRST WORLD WAR

 

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ASHWELLTHORPE POORS LAND PROJECT – Exhibition at Ashwellthorpe Village Hall

Norfolk Rural Community Council has been working on a project tracing the history of various Poors Land charities whilst also aiming to acquaint people with the work of these charities and their roles in various Norfolk communities today and possible evolution in the future To this end, an Exhibition on Display Boards is to be held at Ashwellthorpe Village Hall on FRIDAY 24 January 2014,  from 9.30 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. with a Presentation and Question/Answer Session from 3.00 p.m.

Ashwellthorpe is one of the six parishes featured and its Fuel Allotment Charity, in particular, is being highlighted. Ashwellthorpe’s Fuel Allotment charity dates from the Inclosure Act of two hundred years ago and it is administered completely separately from the Parish Council. Its annual income is £105 in the form of rent from a tenant farmer which amount is distributed each year among residents.

The Parish Council administers another, larger, piece of Poors Land in Ashwellthorpe for which it receives a greater amount in rent from a tenant farmer.

Come along to the Village Hall  on the 24th to find out about these two charities and pass on any suggestions or ideas you might have on their future, possible future recipients etc.

TWO HUNDRED YEARS OF HISTORY IN A PAGE

In the 1790s, three brothers were born in Braintree, Essex – William Browne in 1793, Michael Browne in 1796 and James Browne about 1799 – and they all came to Ashwellthorpe to live, work and marry by 1815 to 1818. Two of the brothers married two Ashwellthorpe sisters and two were weavers, when the weaving industry was still important in Norwich with many outworkers in the local villages and small towns.

They were probably the sons of Peter Browne who was born in Ashwellthorpe about 1754 and lived here until he was apprenticed at 13 by his father to a Shoemaker in Carleton Forehoe for five years. After his apprenticeship was completed, Peter worked in different places, married Mary, lived in Braintree for several years and returned to Ashwellthorpe.

One of the brothers, Michael, who was a weaver and also an agricultural worker, married Elizabeth Howes in 1816 and they had 13 children in Ashwellthorpe between 1817 and 1842. One of their sons, Peter, married Maria, the daughter of one of the Ashwellthorpe blacksmiths Thomas Austin, in 1844, and Peter and Maria lived in Fundenhall for a few years, with him working as a woodman. By 1860, Peter browne had become the Innkeeper at The Mariners Arms, a Lacons Brewery public house, along the Ashwellthorpe Road in Silfield where the family stayed for a few years. They subsequently moved on to Wymondham and then Woodrising, where Peer died in 1907 and Maria in 1914.

Moving rapidly through two more generations – teir son Peter Thomas Austin Browne and his son Walter James Browne – we come to Dorothy, the daughter of Walter. She was born in Wymondham in 1929 and married Leonard Torbuck in Norwich in 1951. The Torbuck family emigrated to Adelaide, South Australia, in 1963 and on 28 April 2013, Dorothy returned to Ashwellthorpe for the first time in many decades. She and her daughter and son-in-law were able to see Dorothy’s great-great-grandparents Michael and Elizabeth’s gravestone in All Saints’ churchyard, the blacksmith Austin’s chimney (with his initials carved into a brick) and bellows, the old Mariners’ public house and the gravestones of her great-grandparents Peter and Maria in Woodrising.

So that brief account covering 200 years of family history in just four paragraphs leads on to the photograph of Dorothy, her daughter Linda and son-in-law Tom, at All Saints Church, Ashwellthorpe, on 28 April 2013.

Photograph of Dorothy Torbuck, daughter Linda and son-in-law Tom at All Saints Church, Ashwellthorpe – 28 April 2013

Jennifer Robbie                                   October 2013

CORONATION MEMORIES of 1953 from Janet Holloway nee Crane

With the interest in the 60th Anniversary of the Coronation of our Queen, I thought the village might be interested to hear of my recollections of 1953. My name is Janet Holloway nee Crane. I was born in 1937 and spent my childhood in Ashwellthorpe until leaving school and home at the age of 16 years in 1953.

Last September I visited the village and spoke to a lady there who mentioned the village website where I have been able to read all about the village and also noticed historical articles would be welcome. I have started to write all about the war time experiences of my family and the house in which we lived, and will send that eventually, but in the meantime, shall just write about 1953.

My parents Arthur and Olive Crane, my three brothers Patrick, Peter, Richard and I, lived with my grandparents Mr and Mrs Gibbons who owned the original house and orchard next to Clarke’s farm. This property was developed later and there are now two sets of terraced houses either side of an extended detached house. The detached house was built for my parents Arthur and Olive Crane in 1952/3 in one half of the orchard. I shall not dwell on this now but just so you can place us in the village.

In the Spring of 1953, Wymondham Town Council decided to celebrate the Coronation with a Carnival Queen and various events spread over one week. Brother Patrick played football for Wymondham Minors and because I was a keen supporter of that team the boys decided, without my knowledge, to enter my name in the Carnival Queen Competition.

The local cinema in Wymondham was packed for the occasion. A number of local girls were entered in the contest, although I don’t recall exactly how many there were. Prior to the showing of the film “Buttons and Bows” we were asked to walk out across the stage one by one and then line up together in front of the judges once they had made their choice.

I wore a lovely pale pink dress typically fifties style, with a fitting bodice and short full skirt, and a pair of black high-heeled sandals lent me by a friend for the evening as I did not possess any suitable shoes. They were the first high heels I had ever worn and i felt so grown up in them. I was very pleased I managed to cross the stage without tripping up and even dared curtsey low to the judges.

I was so thrilled to be picked, and with Christine Walker, a fellow pupil at The Notre Dame High School in Norwich, and Doris Bell as my attendants, we settled down with the judges to watch the film. I was aware there was some disappointment that a Wymondham girl was not chosen.

During the next few weeks it was arranged or us to visit the stores in Wymondham to choose the material for our dresses and our shoes which had been donated, and to the lady who made the dresses for us. Mine was made of white taffeta with a little bolero trimmed with sequins, and we all wore long lace mittens and silver sandals.

I don’t remember much of the carnival procession except driving in the car and waving to the crowds on the way to the Fairland. To my consternation, shortly before my arrival I was informed I would have to speak to those assembled there. I really didn’t know what I was supposed to say and at the last minute the councillor in charge of us scribbled a few words on a slip of paper. I was so grateful for this and standing in front of the mic read the words written for me, but was horrified to hear one in the crowd pronounce in a loud voice that I had read it from a piece of paper.

One of my duties was to present the prizes at the athletic sports event at King’s Head Meadow and I recall visiting older members of the community at a lunch in the WI Hall and being presented with a diamante bracelet from the Council. It was a wonderful experience and a treasured memory.

I had attended the Peggy Carr School of Dancing in Norwich, for many years studying mainly ballet and passed my final teacher’s exam in ballet that Spring. Within a few weeks I had left school and by chance, just a few days later, was called on to take part at very short notice in a touring variety show at Norwich Hippodrome. Thus began my career on the stage and for a few years danced in many shows across the country and also in Spain and Paris at The Moulin Rouge. I had met my husband during a summer show in Bournemouth and that’s where I settled down and live to this day.

Janet Holloway nee Crane formerly of Ashwellthorpe

General Interest items on Local History

ASHWELLTHORPE with FUNDENHALL

We need local history items please. If you have any stories about people or places in the villages or if you know an elderly resident who has stories please send them in to:ashfun-pc@hotmail.co.uk We and the rest of the Parish would love to read them. If you have any pictures of the villages or villagers as they were please send them to us for the Photo Album page.

The villages of Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall are interlinked not only by their adjacency but also by the manorial extent, land ownership, field boundaries and not least, from the 20th Century, by the Village Hall and Parish Council.  They have now, and have probably always had, a distinct character with people and events, societal structure and mobility shaping their individual histories.

This Local History page will cover memories, events and past history which intertwine. The individual village page will carry items of specific relevance to that village – click on the village name  – but if you’re not sure where your interest lies, browse through them all!  And add to them, amend them, comment on and discuss them – all contributions welcome.  Remember – yesterday is already history!

Do You Remember…………? It’s only FORTY years ago

With elections recently around – do you remember

Only three Wards in the Depwade Rural District Council area (the present South Norfolk District Council area) held contests in the May elections in 1960 (is the year right?) – nothing much has changed then this year! Unlike 2007, however, when we did have an election on 3 May to elect just one of two candidates, Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall then had two seats available, with both candidates being returned unopposed – Mr Hubert Doubleday and Mrs Rosemary Tilbrook

Depwade Rural District Council By-election in 1965 for the Ashwellthorpe/Fundenhall Ward – George Edward Rider (Labour) elected with 103 votes; Arthur Kingett (Independent) 93 votes, not elected.  There was a 54% poll.

Other news around us from the 1960s –

Rupert Davies, the actor who played Maigret in the then extremely popular television  series, made a TV appeal in 1962 to raise funds for the Ashwellthorpe Hall Hotel – £3000 was raised and he officially opened the Hotel in 1963.  And Ruby Murray opened the Hall’s annual fete in June 1966. She was a very successful “pop” singer of the 1950s and early 1960s who, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, has held from 1955 onwards the record of having 5 “hits in the Top 20” in the same week – although the present Charts might have 5+ Arctic Monkeys’ hits?

A sale of work at Ashwellthorpe Village Hall raised £30 for Hall funds in June 1964

Red squirrels abounded, or at least bounded around, in 1964

Gibraltar Farm, New Road, Fundenhall (67 Acres) and Ashwellthorpe Grange, near Wreningham Toprow (220 Acres), changed hands in 1964 and 1965 respectively.  And The Rookery estate, Fundenhall, with 11 Acres was sold around the same time too.

Harvest still to be completed at the beginning of October 1965 in Ashwellthorpe, Fundenhall and the immediate vicinity because of waterlogged land from heavy localised storms.

A giant cucumber plant grew from a 6d. (2.5p) Woolworths’ packet of seeds in a greenhouse in Church Lane, Fundenhall.  It reached at least 3.5m (10ft) in height and had at least 100 cucumbers growing on it, some growing in groups like bunches of bananas.

There will be someone amongst our readers who can add to, or put right, some of the snippets about local happenings above by contacting us on email at

ashfun-pc@hotmail.co.uk

Ashwellthorpe History

We need local history items please. If you have any stories about people or places in the village or if you know an elderly resident who has stories please send them in. We and the rest of the Parish would love to read them. If you have any pictures of the village or villagers as they were please send them to us for the Photo Album page.

The villages of Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall are interlinked not only by their adjacency but also by the manorial extent, land ownership, field boundaries and not least, from the 20th Century, by the Village Hall and Parish Council.  They have now, and have probably always had, a distinct character with people and events, societal structure and mobility shaping their individual histories.

The general Local History page will cover memories, events and past history which intertwine. This Ashwellthorpe page will carry items of specific relevance to it – but if you’re not sure where your interest lies, browse through all the pages!  And add to them, amend them, comment on and discuss them – all contributions welcome. Remember – yesterday is already history!

Request for help – HOWES family name

Owen Howes e-mailed us on 19 October 2007 “I am researching my family history and have found Ashwellthorpe the main seat of my family from a RICHARD HOWES born there in 1749”. His Howes families continue well into the 1800s in Ashwellthorpe. Owen would be very interested to hear if anyone has any information on the Howes family of Ashwellthorpe – if you can help him please contact  owenhowes@hotmail.com

History from millions of years ago

The ammonite pictured below was dug up in the flowerbed of a garden in Greenwood Close on Thursday 19 April 2007.  The soil had been well cultivated for nearly forty years and before that the land had been pasture/plum orchard – but it was suddenly unearthed after another bout of light digging.  Although not complete, the pattern is beautiful.  Has it been here, in Ashwellthorpe, for millions of years?  Am I the first person to have seen it? Or has it been a fortuitous import from forty years of cultivation? Can anyone give a likely answer to any of these queries and also add more information on ammonites? What history have you dug up in your gardens or fields in Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall?

Please let us know by contacting ashfun-pc@hotmail.co.uk

The Village Sign and the Ballad of Ashwell Thorp

You will see on the top east-facing panel of the sign the goose, oak leaves and the wording Ashwell Thorpe Oak Legend, a legend passed down in the words of the Ballad of Ashwell-Thorp.  Thomas Knyvett was knighted by Queen Eilzabeth I on her progress through Norfolk and was High Sheriff of the County in 1579 – he died in 1617 and was buried in Ashwellthorpe on 9 February 1617/18.  Historical reports say he was a man of great repute and much loved for his hospitality and good nature and the Ballad echoes this sentiment.

Jennifer Robbie

The Ballad of Ashwell-Thorp

Once there liv’d a Man

Deny it they that can,

Who liberal was to the Poore;

I dare boldly say,

They ne’re were sent away,

Empty Handed from his Doore.

When Misers in Holes crept,

Then open House he kept,

Where many then, did resort,

Some for Love of good Beere

And others for good Cheere,

And others for to make Sport.

There was a Gentleman,

From LONDON citty came,

The Countrey for to see,

And all in the Pryme,

Of jovial CHRISTMASS Time,

There merry for to be.

This LONDONER did say,

If the Gentry would give way,

A Trick to them he w’d show,

That an Acorn he would sett,

If they would please to ha’te,

Which to a great Tree should grow.

The Acorn he pull’d out,

And shewed it all about,

In his Hand then he took it agayne,

In the Presence of them all,

In the middle of the Hall,

He sat down the Acorne playne.

While one could drink a Cup,

There did an Oak spring up,

Which was so huge and tall,

With Arms it so put out,

And Branches all about,

That it almost fill’d the Hall.

This Oak then did beare,

Which was a Thing most rare,

Acorns both black and brown,

For which the Swine did busk,

And they did loose their Husk,

As they came tumbling down.

This great Oake there did stand,

To the View of Every Man,

Who saw, it was so playne,

But Roome then to afford,

To Bring Supper unto Bord,

They wish’t it gone agayne.

Then lowdley he did call,

And two came into the Hall,

Who were both stout and strong,

And with the Tools they had,

To work they went like mad.

And laid this Oake along.

I’le tell you here no Lye,

The Chips there then did flye,

Buzzing about like Flyes,

That Men were forc’d to ward,

Their Faces well to guard,

For Fear they sh’d loose their Eyes.

He bid them then be bold,

And e’ry one take hold,

This Oake for to carry away,

And they all hold did get,

But c’d not stirr’t a whit,

But still along it lay.

He said they had no Strength,

Which he would prove at length,

For it sh’d not lye long on the floor,

Two Goslings young and green,

They then came whewting in,

And carried it out of the Door.

Then gone was the Oake,

That had so many a stroke,

Before that it fell downe,

Thus as it grew in haste,

So quickly did it waste,

Not a Chip then could be found.

This Story is very true,

Which I have told to you,

‘Tis a Wonder you di’nt heare it,

I’le lay a Pint of Wine,

If Parker and old Hinde,

Were alyve, that they w’d swear it.

 

The de Thorp Tomb

Hullo, my name is Humphrey, and I write a letter in the Parish Magazine each month.  For those of you who do not know me, I’m a Cat, and I am now of advanced years.  I like sitting in the sun or by the radiator, killing rats, and other small things that move, and I hate DOGS.  Which brings me to the point of this letter.

There is in our church a most beautiful monument, some have even said that it is the best alabaster tomb in England, be that as it may..It has three DOGS on it..It is 600 years old, and is in need of care and attention.  It also has two people, Sir Edmund de Thorp and his wife Joan, and several angels. For the last 12 months or more it has been held together in a cage of scaffolding, but next week work starts to make it safe and conserve it for the next 600 years, or at any rate, a few more generations.  It is hoped to be completed by Easter.

So I’ve now told you about it, and it is very cold, so I want to get back to the radiator, but perhaps if you have never been in our church you ought to go and see it.  For myself I’m not bothered, I mean DOGS!  People are alright so long as they run a Cat centred household, and as for Angels, well I haven’t met any yet. Bye!

Humphrey is surely the most curious and literate cat in the parish and, as he says above and as some of the residents of Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall already know, he is in the habit of sharing his observations each month in the Church Parish Magazine.

 

The de Thorp TombAshwellthorpe

The alabaster tomb bearing the effigies of Sir Edmund de Thorp and his second wife Joan – daughter of Sir Robert de Northwood and widow of Lord Scales – lies within All Saints Church, Ashwellthorpe.  Lords of the Manor, the de Thorp family – by children, marriages, kinsmen – passed on this manorial lordship right through to the mid-20th Century.

Sir Edmund was the son of another Sir Edmund de Thorp and his wife Joan nee Baynard.   Sir Edmund was killed in 1418 during the siege of the castle in Louvier, Normandy, where he had been one of King Henry V’s men and his body was brought back to Ashwellthorpe for burial in his Chapel. He had the Chapel – Thorp Chapel – added to the north of the Chancel in 1393 to become his eventual burial place.   This pre-Reformation tomb is one of only two remaining in Norfolk and lies between the Chancel and Thorp Chapel.  Originally under a wooden canopy, the white alabaster effigies lie on the alabaster tomb chest; Sir Edmund in full armour with his helm[et] under his head, his wife lying beside him, a pillow under her head supported by Angels. The west end of the tomb chest is now of stone rather than alabaster and over three centuries, graffiti of names and initials have been carved into the alabaster.

The recent problems with the tomb’s foundations have seen it slipping into a void and, without repair work, it could have crumbled and broken up. Restoration in 1967, funded by the Pilgrim Trust, resulted in a thorough cleaning of the tomb and the repainting of the eight heraldic shields around its base.  As Humphrey tells us above, funds have been raised and repair work is about to start with stability and restoration completed by Easter 2007.

Much more detailed information about the de Thorp family and the tomb itself can be found in the following sources which can be seen in the Norfolk Studies section of Norfolk Heritage Centre at the Forum in Norwich.

‘An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk’, Volume 3, Francis Blomefield, 1769

“The de Thorp Tomb at Ashwellthorpe”, Donovan Purcell, TD, MA, FRIBA, in ‘Norfolk Archaeology’ Vol. 34, Part 3, 1969

“A 14th Century Contract for Carpenter’s Work at Ashwellthorpe Church”, Paul Cattermole, in ‘Norfolk Archaeology’ Vol. 40, 1989

‘Ashwellthorpe Hall and its History’, Michael Lawrence, Fifth Impression, 2000

The Restoration Work being carried out on the de Thorp Tomb

February 2007

The void beneath the de Thorp Tomb

The flint, brick and lime mortar supporting piers for the de Thorp Tomb, believed to be the original work of c. 1418

de Thorp Tomb Restoration at end of February 2007

New brick with lime mortar supports between original supporting piers.  You can see the air holes which have been left between the brick layers – this will allow air to circulate around and within the alabaster tomb when it is reconstructed to prevent damp permeating the alabaster.

de Thorp Tomb repaired – end April 2007

 

You will see from the photographs below that repairs to the foundations and supporting pillars of the de Thorp tomb are now complete and its various pieces have all been put together again to return it to its original form!

The tomb has been made safe from the risk of sinking into the void beneath and the possibility of it breaking-up through such subsidence and through damp has now been avoided.  The repair work was finished by Easter and the church was ready for the Easter services.

Unfortunately, some unforeseen factors led to a budget shortfall with more fund-raising being organised at this moment to successfully complete the financial side of this project.

Ashwellthorpe http://www.ukaerialphotos.com/viewer.asp?D=R&l=Norfolk+1942+%2D+1954&x=613954&y=297662&s=1000&sl=0.5&year=1945

The above link is an interesting wartime photograph of Ashwellthorpe taken by the Luftwaffe. It is worth looking to see how little development there was then.

  • Information from Genuki Norfolk on Ashwellthorpe. This gives links to many historical sites including census, churches, maps (old and new) and much more. Warning : you will find this so interesting that you will spend a lot of time just searching.
  • Directory of Ashwellthorpe 1854 giving details of people, church, tithes etc Click here
  • Ashwellthorpe (previously Thorpe) Manor record

Fundenhall History

We need local history items please. If you have any stories about people or places in the village or if you know an elderly resident who has stories please send them in. We and the rest of the Parish would love to read them. If you have any pictures of the village or villagers as they were please send them to us for the Photo Album page.

The villages of Ashwellthorpe and Fundenhall are interlinked not only by their adjacency but also by the manorial extent, land ownership, field boundaries and not least, from the 20th Century, by the Village Hall and Parish Council.  They have now, and have probably always had, a distinct character with people and events, societal structure and mobility shaping their individual histories.

The general Local History page will cover memories, events and past history which intertwine. This Fundenhall page will carry items of specific relevance to it – but if you’re not sure where your interest lies, browse through all the pages!  And add to them, amend them, comment on and discuss them – all contributions welcome. Remember – yesterday is already history!

  • Information from Genuki Norfolk on Fundenhall. This gives links to many historical sites including census, churches, maps (old and new) and much more. Warning : you will find this so interesting that you will spend a lot of time just searching.

The history of Fundenhall Mill from an advert in the Norfolk Chronicle in 1815 to it’s closure in 1906. The dates of sales and names of the Millers are given. For this information please click here

 

Village signs of Fundenhall and Ashwellthorpe

ASHWELLTHORPE VILLAGE SIGN

Ashwellthorpe village sign commemorates the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II’s reign of 1977 and was designed by Mr Tony Cleary and sculpted from a piece of solid elm by Mr Barry Watkins – both residents of Ashwellthorpe. The shaft, with a double-sided name board at its top, is set in a stone plinth made by a local builder Mr Ivan King and surrounded by granite sets and cobble stones, the whole being originally encircled by an oak seat.

The shaft has twenty-four carved pictorial panels recording aspects of village life, both historical and contemporary.   The bottom tier of panels bears eight heraldic shields representing the de Thorp, Bourchier, Berners, Knyvett and Wilson families who held the manor and lived in Ashwellthorpe Hall over time. There is then a row of panels depicting a comedy/tragedy mask, plough, red squirrel, flowers and the ancient church door handle.  The next circular row of panels has Ashwellthorpe Hall, the famous alabaster tomb of Sir  Edmund de Thorp and his wife, a representation of The Knyvett Letters written by Sir Thomas Knyvett at the time of the English Civil War in the 17th Century, a tractor, and ears of corn.  The Legend of the Ashwellthorpe Oak, the Huggin family of clockmakers, the Church porch, Jubilee sign, musical instruments and sporting equipment are represented on the top row of panels.

A time capsule containing photos of the village, a copy of the parish magazine, a Jubilee Crown, present-day coins and the histories of the Church and Ashwellthorpe Hall was placed in the base of the plinth.

Ashwellthorpe’s village sign was erected on the Green in front of All Saints Church and unveiled by Mr Timothy Colman, Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk, on October 29, 1978. The sign won an Award from the Norfolk Society in 1982 – along with the Fundenhall Village sign – and was described as “combining imagination, style and function”.  The Norfolk Society Awards were presented at its annual meeting on 21 April 1982.

Sadly, the elm sign crashed to the ground in high winds during the night of March 28/29, 1997.  After much consideration it was decided the original sign should be replaced by one made of glass fibre.  The original sculptor Barry Watkins was able to intricately remodel the various damaged carvings of the elm shaft in modelling clay to enable the company Glass Fibre Engineers of Ashwellthorpe Industrial Estate to make a mould and replica sign which was unveiled on April 30, 1998.   The damaged pieces of the original elm carved shaft are stored in the room above the porch of All Saints Church, Ashwellthorpe. A photograph of the east-facing panel of the sign is shown below along with photographs of the 1998 unveiling.

Jennifer Robbie

East-facing panel of the replica glass-fibre Ashwellthorpe Village Sign – March 2006

Those present at the 1998 unveiling included Barry Watkins the sculptor; the Managing Director of Glass Fibre Engineers; Jennifer Robbie; Hedley Smith; Richard Tilbrook; Rosemary Tilbrook; David Turner and Clare Watkins